NUI Galway Researchers use x-ray technology to develop personalised osteoporosis treatment

Friday, 19 August 2022

NUI Galway
Dr Lan Yang, Dr Brian Whelan, Associate Professor Mary Dempsey, Professor John Carey, Marie Caffrey, Dr Attracta Brennan, and Catherine Hickey Ui Mhaoláin. Credit: Andrew Downes, Xposure.

NUI Galway clinicians, computer scientists and engineers are using enhanced x-ray technology used to measure bone density in people across Galway, Leitrim and Sligo to develop new osteoporosis screening and testing strategies for early identification of the condition in patients. 

Funded by the Health Research Board, the Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry Management Application Project (DXA MAP), uses state of the art machines to develop a personalised, patient-centred tool for osteoporosis screening and fracture prediction.

Professor of Medicine at NUI Galway and Clinical Lead for DXA, Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Disorders, at Galway University Hospitals, John Carey said: “The cross disciplinary expertise enables the development of a smart screening methodology to reduce health costs, maximise healthcare efficiencies, reduce waiting times and improve patient care and quality of life.”

The DXA MAP tool will be underpinned by artificial intelligence, recommended diagnostic criteria, reference standards and visualisation approaches to support osteoporosis and fracture risk prediction, clinical interpretation and clinical-patient communication. The DXA MAP project also aims to support clinician interpretation through more automated processes and could predict Covid-19 and multi-morbidity risk using DXA secondary-data.

The project will be carried out by the University’s College of Science and Engineering and the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Science, and led by Dr Attracta Brennan, Professor John Carey and Associate Professor Mary Dempsey. 

The DXA MAP project includes patients and collaborators in Tsinghua University and Oxford University.

Ends

Keywords: Press.

Author: Marketing and Communications Office, NUI Galway
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